Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
in connecticut. as has happened after other recent shooting sprees, sales of assault-style rifles have seen a spike in gun shops since the massacre. many buyers seem to fear the weapons will be banned and want to get one legally before hand. >> ceremonies have been held in several asian countries to remember the victims of the tsunami that struck several years ago. hundreds of thousands of people were killed in one of the biggest natural disasters in recent history. >> a powerful earthquake unleashed deadly waves across the indian ocean. thailand was one of the countries hit by the disaster. >> different faiths united in morning -- brutus, muslims, christians remembering those who died here in 2004. in thailand, the tsunami swept more than 5000 people to their deaths. many were tourists. along the coastline, people from dozens of countries parish. >> as we go farther away from the sorrow of what happened that day, we want to remember and let people know that the world can be one. >> the natural disaster struck with brutal force, leaving an equally staggering trail of destruction in its wake
from new york, new jersey and connecticut alone say they will need closer to 82 billion to fix their states. >>> we don't know their names, but a couple from a phoenix suburb has presented the second winning ticket from last month's massive powerball drawing. the couple came forward now because they were concerned about, guess what, the looming fiscal cliff. they will take home 192 million bucks before taxes, and the plan is to use the money to start a foundation and support their favorite charities. >>> more people out of work, and another recession. you want to know what's at the bottom of that fiscal cliff, well, there you have it. many say that what's going to happen if something isn't done soon, but guess what? alice rivlin has a plan. she's a senior fellow at the brookings institution and served as director of the white house office of management and budget, the omb, under president clinton. alice, good morning. >> good morning. >> nice to have you here on the show this morning. you're saying that it's too late for the lame duck congress to pass legislation to fix all the
and connecticut are teaming up to request almost $83 billion in federal help. >>> also on capitol hill, the senate has just passed its version of a defense bill. it's a $631 billion measure. it calls for a quicker withdrawal of u.s. troops from afghanistan and tougher sanctions on iran. it would also give military personnel a 1.7% raise. that vote was 98-0. unanimous. the senate and house must work out a compromise. >>> now we turn to egypt where tv stations are expected to go dark today in protest over the president's recent power grab. tensions are still simmering as thousands of demonstrators have taken their anger back to tahrir square. abc's alex marquardt reports. >> reporter: they came by the tens of thousands, hurling stones, pulling down barricades, riot police fired volumes of tear gas and retreated. as the masses grew, president mohammed morsi left the palace. ever since the revolution that captivated the world, egypt has struggled on the road to democracy. two weeks ago president morsi gave himself unchecked powers he says to put egypt on a democratic path. there was outrage on tahrir
. you know, the court in a case called griswald versus connecticut know there is a right to privacy in the u.s. constitution. but it has never been explicitly applied to text messaging and -- this case and if a law like this is passed, i think you will see the courts looking at whether text messages are legitimately private. i will say one thing, it is clear, by the way, that the cops would have to get a certain much warrant to get your text messages. but here, this is a law that will force companies to save the text messages for an extensive period of time. >> does it make them liable? >> well, maybe american citizens don't want the stuff stored for an extensive period of time. let's say you were applying for a job and the employer said you know something, i want to see what kind of a person you are, give me an authorization for all your text message it is last five years. and you say -- oh, what? how many american citizens would want that to happen? this is a major privacy issue. it has never been addressed directly by congress. i think it is going to be enormously controversial.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)